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Biogenesis

ESPN’s Buster Olney Talks A-Rod Suspension and Baseball Hall of Fame

by Nolan Silbernagel

Flickr || ccfo

Buster Olney seinor writer for ESPN the Magazine was able to join One on One shortly after the breaking news of Alex Rodriguez’s 162 game suspension.  He talked about whether the full season ban was surprising to him, what kind of precedent this set for Major League Baseball moving forward, and if the disgruntled third baseman will ever play again in the Majors.

When Baseball Becomes the Bad Guy

by Kenny Ducey

Keith Allison/Flickr

It’s a story that you’ve probably seen countless times; two leading characters despise each other. One who relates to the audience with his positive morals, and the other who is the polar opposite, are forced to team up in order to halt the evil-doings of a larger-than-life villain. Along the way, however, the better man has to resort to the tactics of the skeevier one in order to get the job done.

ESPN’s Buster Olney Joins One on One

by Nolan Silbernagel

flickr || KImberly*

Nolan Silbernagel and Matt Rosenfeld sat down with Buster Olney of the ESPN family of networks and asked him all questions regarding the recent suspensions of players tied to taking performance enhancing drugs.  Olney gives his take as to whether or not this past Monday, which was when 12 players were suspended for taking PED’s, was a good or bad day for baseball, if he was surprised only Alex Rodriguez appealed the suspension, and if he expects the penalties to get tougher against players using PED’s.

Crisis Management

by Jake Kring-Schreifels

Flickr | Steve Paluch

Last week Milwaukee Brewers leftfielder Ryan Braun was suspended for 65 games by Major League Baseball for violating its basic agreement and joint drug prevention and treatment program. He did not appeal the suspension, inferring that he knew the severity of evidence held against him, and the potential of lingering criticism that would follow him to every city the rest of the season. Finally, baseball got the man that had cheated them, on the field and in court.