Listener Supported Public Media from Fordham University

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Tunein
  • YouTube
  • Flickr
  • Syndicate content

Victoria Azarenka

US Open Diary Part 4

by Jake Kring-Schreifels

Previous Entries: Part 1- Part 2- Part 3

I’m running, no sprinting, out of the bowels of Arthur Ashe Stadium, one last time past the cafeteria, through the media garden door, into the plaza, round the fountain, and up the Court of Champions. I’ve got five minutes to catch the shuttle bus and the main entrance gate ahead of me is closed. I’ve got forty pages to read about Old Testament codes of purity related to things like bestiality and eating pork because I have class tomorrow. The gate is locked and I’m cursing and I’m going to miss this bus and I’m going to get in past midnight and I’m going to be tired all day and...

US Open Diary Part 3

by Jake Kring-Schreifels

Read Part 1, and Part 2

There is a cafeteria for the media and sometimes, well most times, there are some quite bizarre encounters waiting in line for my dinner. There are interactions that make me want to scream and there are ones at which I’m compelled to laugh. Here are two.

Random woman, definitely American, speaking to server:

US Open Diary Part 1

by Jake Kring-Schreifels

Victoria Duval

The US Open is like Wimbledon’s rowdy little cousin. There aren’t perfectly chalked white lines or delicately mowed lawns or robotized ball boys. No, Queens has some hard court bounce and bravado. The pop music echoes between games, the fans scream when they feel it necessary. Even the players get creative and colorfully coordinated, freed from their white-clothed shackles, matching neon oranges from headband to shoelace. Across the East River, in Manhattan’s shadow where there’s room to breathe, the grunts grow louder and the cheers build to roars. If Quentin Tarantino were directing this major tournament, he’d call it Tennis Unchained

Serena Sunday

by Jake Kring-Schreifels

While most of the country’s eyes were glued to opening day of football, it was just as monumental  a day for tennis. Due to severe weather conditions Saturday evening, the last men’s semi-final and women’s final were played Sunday at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Before the women’s match, Andre Agassi was inducted into the US Open Court of Champions. In Flushing, football became an afterthought.

Serena and Azarenka to play in finals

by Amit Badlani

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ishot71/7899815074/

The final four in the women's draw were narrowed down to two earlier today. #1 seed from Belarus Victoria Azarenka and #4 seed American Serena Williams will face in the finals scheduled for tomorrow night.

Rainy Day at Flushing Meadows

by Amit Badlani
http://www.flickr.com/photos/asterix611/7933793054/

Well, the effects of Hurricane Isaac were bound to travel up the east coast and ruin at least one day of the US Open. Viewers of day nine saw only two singles matches get completed because of the rain.

Day 7: Halfway Home

by Jake Kring-Schreifels, Ben Kelly

Just two days after what may have been Andy Roddick’s most emotional match, it wasn’t unforeseeable that Sunday could have been his last. Like a baseball team that plays lethargic on a Sunday afternoon following a late night walk-off win, Roddick had to quell Friday Night Lights residue. After four sets however, retirement was delayed once more.

Roddick defeated Fabio Fognini 7-5, 7-6, 4-6, 6-4 and continued his fight against putting down the racquet. Once again, even in a half-filled Arthur Ashe stadium, the Flushing fans made their presence felt for their American.

Clijsters Says Goodbye

by Amit Badlani

Kim Clijsters finished her singles career on the same court where she won three grand slams. The 23rd seeded Belgian fell to Great Britain's Laura Robson at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Clijsters stated before the US Open that this will be her last tournament, so inherently the loss will be her last singles match. She sat at the interview podium for half an hour, answering questions about her whole career spanning from her toughest loss to what she believes her legacy will be.